Save Your Family Stress and Plan Your Funeral

Making your way through the process of the death of a family member is an extremely personal journey, as well as a very big business that can put a financial strain on the surviving family.

Rate.com’s recent article entitled “Plan Your Own Funeral, Cheaply, and Leave Behind a Happier Family”  notes that on an individual basis, it can be a significant cost for a family dealing with grief. The National Funeral Directors Association found that the median cost for a traditional funeral, with a basic casket that also includes a vault (the casket liner most cemeteries require) can cost more than $9,000. With the cost of a (single) plot and the services of the cemetery to take care of the burial and ongoing maintenance and other expenses,  it can total more than $15,000.

Instead, if you opt for cremation and a simple service, it will run only $3,000 or less. That would save your estate or your family $13,000. Think of the amount of legacy that can grow from your last wishes.

Without your directions, your grieving family is an easy mark for a death care industry that’s run for profit. Even with federal disclosure rules, most states make it impossible to easily comparison shop among funeral service providers, and online price lists aren’t required. However, you can do the legwork to make it easier on your family, when you pass.

Funeral homes also aren’t usually forthright about costs that are required rather than optional. The median embalming cost is $750.However, there’s no regulation requiring embalming. Likewise, a body need not be placed in a casket for cremation. The median cost for a cremation casket is $1,200 but an alternative “container” might cost less than $200.

The best thing you can do for your family is to write it down your wishes and plans and make it immediately discoverable.

It can be a great relief to tell your family everything you want (and don’t want). However, if that’s not feasible with your family dynamics, be certain that you detail of all your wishes in writing. You should also make sure that the document can be easily located by your executor.

Here’s a simple option: Write everything out, place your instructions in a sealed envelope and let your children and the executor know the location of the letter.

This elementary step can be the start to helping their decision-making when you pass away, and potentially provide some extra money to help them reach their goals.

Reference: rate.com (June 21, 2020) “Plan Your Own Funeral, Cheaply, and Leave Behind a Happier Family”

 

Don’t Neglect a Plan for Your Pet During the Pandemic

If you have a pet, chances are you have worried about what would happen to your furry companion if something were to happen to you. However, worrying and having an actual plan are two very different things, as discussed at a Council of Aging webinar. That’s the subject of the article “COA speakers urge pet owners to plan for their animal’s future” that appeared in The Harvard Press.

It’s stressful to worry about something happening, but it’s not that difficult to put something in place. After you’ve got a plan for yourself, your children and your property, add a plan for your pet.

Start by considering who would really commit to caring for your pet, if you had a long-term illness or in the event of your unexpected passing. Have a discussion with them. Don’t assume that they’ll take care of your pet. A casual agreement isn’t enough. The owner needs to be sure that the potential caretaker understands the degree of commitment and responsibility involved.

If you should need to receive home health care, don’t also assume that your health care provider will be willing to take care of your pet. It’s best to find a pet sitter or friend who can care for the pet before the need arises. Write down the pet’s information: the name and contact info for the vets, the brand of food, medication and any behavioral quirks.

There are legal documents that can be put into place to protect a pet. Your will can contain general directions about how the pet should be cared for, and a certain amount of money can be set aside in a will, although that method may not be legally enforceable. Owners cannot leave money directly to a pet, but a pet trust can be created to hold money to be used for the benefit of the pet, under the management of the trustee. The trust can also be accessed while the owner is still living. Therefore, if the owner becomes incapacitated, the pet’s care will not be interrupted.

An estate planning attorney will know the laws concerning pet trusts in your state. Not all states permit them, although many do.

A pet trust is also preferable to a mention in a will, because the caretaker will have to wait until the will is probated to receive funds to care for your pet. The cost of veterinary services, food, medication, boarding or pet sitters can add up quickly, as pet owners know.

A durable power of attorney can also be used to make provisions for the care of a pet. The person in that role has the authority to access and use the owner’s financial resources to care for the animal.

The legal documents will not contain information about the pet, so it’s a good idea to provide info on the pet’s habits, medications, etc., in a separate document. Choose the caretaker wisely—your pet’s well-being will depend upon it!

Reference: The Harvard Press (May 14, 2020) “COA speakers urge pet owners to plan for their animal’s future”

 

Do I Need a Medigap Policy?

Medigap supplemental policies are sold by private insurance companies and either fully or partially cover cost-sharing aspects of Medicare Part A (hospital coverage) and Part B (outpatient care). However, one thing that feeds into the premium cost is how the insurer “rates” its Medigap policies, explains  CNBC’s recent article entitled “A ‘Medigap’ policy picks up some costs that Medicare won’t. Here are tips for choosing one.”

In fact, some insurers will provide discounts for two policies in the same household. Therefore, you would want to understand a carrier’s premium rating system, its claims history and the caliber of its customer service department. Don’t buy a policy just based on the cost.

About 62.3 million people, most of whom are 65 or older, are enrolled in Medicare. About a third of beneficiaries opt to get their Part A (hospital coverage) and Part B (outpatient care) benefits through an Advantage Plan (Part C). Those plans offer out-of-pocket limits and frequently will have dental and vision coverage or other benefits. They also typically provide Part D prescription drug coverage. The rest use original Medicare — Parts A and B — and, typically, add a standalone Part D prescription plan. In that scenario, unless you have some other type of coverage (i.e., employer-sponsored insurance or you get extra coverage from Medicaid), the option for lowering your out-of-pocket costs is a Medigap policy.

When you initially enroll in Part B, you have six months to buy a Medigap policy without an insurance company reviewing your health history and deciding whether to insure you. After this period ends, depending on the specifics of your situation and the state in which you reside, you may have to go through underwriting.

The reasons to buy a Medigap plan are different for each individual. A big difference in premiums can come from how they are “rated.” If you know this, it may help you to appreciate what may happen to your premium in the future. There are some insurers’ Medigap policies that are “community-rated.” This means everyone who buys a particular policy pays the same rate, no matter what their age. Other plans are based on “attained age.” That means the rate you receive at purchase, is based upon your age and will go up as you get older. A few others use “issue age,” where the rate will stay the same as you age, but it’s based on your age at the time you purchase the policy.

Your premiums also may jump from year to year due to other factors, like inflation and insurer increases.

Remember to see if there’s a household discount. Many insurers have this, and it can save 3% to 14%.

Reference: CNBC (June 15, 2020) “A ‘Medigap’ policy picks up some costs that Medicare won’t. Here are tips for choosing one”